Hyderabad Youth Melody with Melodica Creates Inroads – The New Indian Express

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Express press service

The melodica may not be a well-known instrument in Indian music circles, but this “hand-held free-reed instrument” has been in use since its conception in 1950 and is slowly making its way among virtuosos of the music.

NSR Sankalp, 20, took up melodica six months ago and music lovers are noticing this new sound. During a telephone conversation, Sankalp says that he started playing the keyboard thirteen years ago and that he discovered the melodica.

“I wanted to imitate the sound of an accordion and as I like to play songs with varying dynamics, I found the sound of the melodica closest as it allows me to do this via the breath,” he says. He mentions that he had seen it on television and had asked his father to buy one and had been attached to it ever since.

A student of Saraswathi Sangeetha Nritya Sikshanalayam, Sankalp learned to play the piano from his teacher, Sakshit, whom he credits with introducing him to Western classical music. He had also learned Carnatic chanting from Prathima Sashidar, who founded the institution and is pursuing a degree in the same.

At the same time, he is also pursuing his CA and is expected to graduate next month. He is currently in 6th year piano at Trinity College London.

When asked if he had taken part in any competitions, whether at university or elsewhere, he replied that he only practiced the instrument as an escape and a passion, but that he did not was not enthusiastic about participating. “My music is more of a passion than just going to concerts and events. It’s also a stress reliever,” says Sankalp.

He also mentioned how much he was keen on creating and developing his unique style of melodica. He also mentioned that he was part of the Satya Seva organization where they gather every week and perform Samithi Bhajans.

He previously played harmonium but has replaced it with melodica since he got it.

When asked if he followed or was influenced by any other melodica player, whether Indian or international, he replied saying that he has no influence when it comes to melodica as he had discovered it on his own and had also learned to play the same way.

However, he mentioned that Stephen Devassy was a piano idol. He argued strongly that the melodica cannot be restricted by genre and can be incorporated anywhere from Indian classical to western jazz, as it is ultimately how you play the instrument that matters.

Asked about the growth potential of this instrument in India and Hyderabad, he remains extremely positive. “The emergence of various Telugu bands these days could help in this endeavor as the bands use this instrument and could catch the attention of their listeners, making them choose the instrument as well,” he said.

The melodica may not be a well-known instrument in Indian music circles, but this “hand-held free-reed instrument” has been in use since its conception in 1950 and is slowly making its way among virtuosos of the music. NSR Sankalp, 20, took up melodica six months ago and music lovers are noticing this new sound. During a telephone conversation, Sankalp says that he started playing the keyboard thirteen years ago and that he discovered the melodica. “I wanted to imitate the sound of an accordion and as I like to play songs with varying dynamics, I found the sound of the melodica closest as it allows me to do this via the breath,” he says. He mentions that he had seen it on television and had asked his father to buy one and had been attached to it ever since. A student of Saraswathi Sangeetha Nritya Sikshanalayam, Sankalp learned to play the piano from his teacher, Sakshit, whom he credits with introducing him to Western classical music. He had also learned Carnatic chanting from Prathima Sashidar, who founded the institution and is pursuing a degree in the same. At the same time, he is also pursuing his CA and is expected to graduate next month. He is currently in 6th year piano at Trinity College London. When asked if he had taken part in any competitions, whether at university or elsewhere, he replied that he only practiced the instrument as an escape and a passion, but that he did not was not enthusiastic about participating. “My music is more of a passion than just going to concerts and events. It’s also a stress reliever,” says Sankalp. He also mentioned how much he was keen on creating and developing his unique style of melodica. He also mentioned that he was part of the Satya Seva organization where they gather every week and perform Samithi Bhajans. He previously played harmonium but has replaced it with melodica since he got it. When asked if he followed or was influenced by any other melodica player, whether Indian or international, he replied saying that he has no influence when it comes to melodica as he had discovered it on his own and had also learned to play the same way. However, he mentioned that Stephen Devassy was a piano idol. He argued strongly that the melodica cannot be restricted by genre and can be incorporated anywhere from Indian classical to western jazz, as it is ultimately how you play the instrument that matters. Asked about the growth potential of this instrument in India and Hyderabad, he remains extremely positive. “The emergence of various Telugu bands these days could help in this endeavor as the bands use this instrument and could catch the attention of their listeners, making them choose the instrument as well,” he said.

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