Get ready to groove on Navratri Special Melody by Divya Chaudhary and Mitul Chaudhary

Divya Chaudhary and Mitul Chaudhary

New Delhi : The Covid-19 outbreak deprived people of Garba’s celebrations last year. Now that things are improving, there is good news for Garba fans. When people are all ready to groove at garba from October 7th after a long time, famous Gujarati singer and folk performer, Divya Chaudhary and her assistant presenter Mitul Chaudhary offer many surprises for garba lovers with their exhilarating treasure. non-stop garba melody. True to the unwavering spirit of Navratri and the unwavering dedication of Maa Ambe, the duo team are all the more excited to have the people of the Garba party revel in their surprises!

Divya Chaudhari is a quintessential folk singer and MitulChaudhary is a presenter. They performed a variety of Gujarati songs which managed to touch the audience. They are one of the most beloved “jodi”, given that they have managed to deliver some of the best music. Some of their all-time bestselling compositions Bhagvan Pan Bhulo Padyo, Vara PachiAvse Varo, Kanha Tari Mithi Morli and Rame RameMogal Nav Naurto ‘among others.

The musical couple has a unique image in the world of singing; through their in-depth understanding of classical Indian music and local traditional folk melodies. Their songs have been viewed millions of times on YouTube on their channel called “Divya ChaudhariOfficial”. Having won such a gigantic love from the audience, they usually present a variety of regional, national and international live music programs, not to mention events such as the Navratri festival, weddings and other occasions. In addition, their notoriety has given rise to numerous collaborations with renowned singers.

Speaking about their musical performance both, DivyaChaudhary and Mitul Chaudhary said, “People love our melodious musical razzmatazz. Our melodious harmony with an exciting track record of successful musical performances has caused many to fade away. This year, while Navratri is eagerly awaited, we are too euphoric to deliver great performances to our garba aficionados. When people are anxiously waiting to shake a leg on the tune of the garba, we will definitely increase the stakes on the excitement of garba lovers.

It doesn’t fail to say that the garba dance also adds value to the spirit of Navratri alongside the devotion of MaaAmbe. All people of different ages are delighted to celebrate Navratri with the same enthusiasm. Now that DivyaChaudhary and Mitul Chaudhari are performing for nine gorgeous nights, one can make the most of their Garba celebrations with all the new fervor and have fun with the duo’s echoing beats.

Speaking about the celebration of Navratri, they added, “We are wholeheartedly ready to uplift the minds of garba lovers while reopening the zest of Navratri with a wave of melodious music. When we give our heart and soul to perform our spellbinding tunes this Navratri, garba lovers will be delighted to play, dance and get lost in the nine melodious nights of Navratri with us.


Source link

Kogado Studio announces rhythmic adventure game Star Melody: Yumemi Dreamer for PS4, Switch and PC

Kogado Studio announced a rhythmic adventure game Melody of the Stars: Yumemi Dreamer for PlayStation 4, Switch and PC (Steam). It will launch digitally this fall with support for English, Japanese, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified Chinese language options.

Here is an overview of the game, via its official site:

On

Melody of the Stars: Yumemi Dreamer is a rhythmic adventure game developed by the Kuroneko-san team at Kogado Studio, who have already produced a number of popular bishoujo games such as Angelic serenade and Symphonic Rain.

Story

Yumemi Nanahoshi is an ordinary middle school student who lives in the small suburban seaside town of Hoshimaki.

However, one day, a creature named Kirara – the princess of Little Star, a planet destroyed by a monster called Muma – appeared before the ordinary Yumemi.

Muma, who manipulates nightmares to devour people’s souls, has followed Kirara to Earth in pursuit.

To save everyone, Yumemi must become a “Dreamer” and defeat Muma with “Purification Songs”! With the support of her childhood friend Kanato, Yumemi becomes a Dreamer and continues to fight Muma.

To protect peace on earth. And to protect everyone’s dreams!

Staff

  • Planning and manufacturing: Kogadu Studio’s Kuroneko-san team
  • Director: Kurou Torikoshi (Kogado Studio)
  • Composition of the series: Daisuke Tazawa (Scenario Koubou Gekko), Pan Tachibana
  • Scenario supervision: Maoto Nishikawa (Kogado Studio), Literacy Department of Kogado Studio
  • Character design: akkeyJin
  • Graphic supervision: Kogado Studio Digital Art Department
  • Film production: yo-yu
  • Good cooperation: Studio mouse
  • Musical cooperation: Bit groove promotion
  • Opening theme song
    • Title: “Eternal glow”
    • Lyrics and composition: YOFFY (Psychic lover)
    • Arrangement: Kenichiro Ohishi
    • Singer: Emi uema
    • Musical writing: Mash Up Entertainment

Watch the trailer below.


Source link

Kogado Studio announces Star Melody: Yumei Dreamer rhythm adventure game for PS4, Switch and PC

Kogado Studio announced a rhythmic adventure game Melody of the Stars: Yumemi Dreamer for PlayStation 4, Switch and PC (Steam). It will launch digitally this fall with support for English, Japanese, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified Chinese language options.

Here is an overview of the game, via its official site:

On

Melody of the Stars: Yumemi Dreamer is a rhythmic adventure game developed by the Kuroneko-san team at Kogado Studio, who have already produced a number of popular bishoujo games such as Angelic serenade and Symphonic Rain.

Story

Yumemi Nanahoshi is an ordinary middle school student who lives in the small suburban seaside town of Hoshimaki.

However, one day, a creature named Kirara – the princess of Little Star, a planet destroyed by a monster called Muma – appeared before the ordinary Yumemi.

Muma, who manipulates nightmares to devour people’s souls, has followed Kirara to Earth in pursuit.

To save everyone, Yumemi must become a “Dreamer” and defeat Muma with “Purification Songs”! With the support of her childhood friend Kanato, Yumemi becomes a Dreamer and continues to fight Muma.

To protect peace on earth. And to protect everyone’s dreams!

Staff

  • Planning and manufacturing: Kogadu Studio’s Kuroneko-san team
  • Director: Kurou Torikoshi (Kogado Studio)
  • Composition of the series: Daisuke Tazawa (Scenario Koubou Gekko), Pan Tachibana
  • Scenario supervision: Maoto Nishikawa (Kogado Studio), Literacy Department of Kogado Studio
  • Character design: akkeyJin
  • Graphic supervision: Kogado Studio Digital Art Department
  • Film production: yo-yu
  • Good cooperation: Studio mouse
  • Musical cooperation: Bit groove promotion
  • Opening theme song
    • Title: “Eternal glow”
    • Lyrics and composition: YOFFY (Psychic lover)
    • Arrangement: Kenichiro Ohishi
    • Singer: Emi uema
    • Musical writing: Mash Up Entertainment

Watch the trailer below.


Source link

How Todd Mosby’s Imrat Guitar Lets Him Combine Western Harmony With Indian Melodies For An Exciting Hybrid Sound

With roots in jazz, folk and Indian classical music, guitarist Todd Mosby is eclectic to say the least. In the mid-90s he needed an ax that could accommodate the techniques and compositional ideas he had drawn from his Eastern and Western influences.

As a result, he co-designed a unique hybrid instrument which he calls the Imrat Guitar, which combines elements of the guitar and Indian instruments such as the sitar and rudra veena.

We can hear it on Mosby’s latest album, Aerial views, a set of soft-hued Impressionist jazz compositions featuring prominent players like bassist Tony Levin (King Crimson, Peter Gabriel) and drummer Jerry Marotta (Peter Gabriel, Paul McCartney).

The Imrat Guitar is named after Mosby’s longtime Indian music teacher, famed master Ustad Imrat Khan, who taught the sitar to George Harrison and Brian Jones in the 1960s and then resided in Mosby’s hometown of St. Louis, Missouri.

“I studied with Imrat for about four years, starting with regular acoustic guitar,” Mosby says. “But I got to a point where I needed to access deeper levels of Indian music. Fortunately, I knew a luthier, Kim Schwartz, who already had a design a little up to what I had in mind. So the three of us started making plans for a personal instrument that I could use as a jazz musician. “

Mosby’s Imrat electric guitar resembles a harp in many ways. The fingerboard has five main playing strings plus three chikari (rhythmic drone) strings. The harp above the fingerboard consists of 12 sympathetic strings. All strings are suspended from one of two sitar-style jivari bridges which help create a buzzing and resonating tone similar to a sitar.

The fingerboard is scalloped and features jumbo frets, allowing spectacular bends of the microtonal strings, essential to the interpretation of Indian classical music. But you can also play chords, which are necessary for most forms of Western music, such as jazz.

“Western music has taken harmony to the highest level with Schoenberg and other classical composers,” says Mosby. “And in India, they ended up taking the melody to the absolute highest level. With the Imrat guitar, I can integrate these two beautiful traditions into my playing. “


Source link

Rachana Shah and Rhythm Wagholikar express their wishes for Lata Mangeshkar

India

Oi-Oneindia staff

|

Posted: Tuesday September 28th, 2021 04:13 PM [IST]

Google One News India

When it comes to singing in the Indian subcontinent, one name that will forever be etched in the hearts of music lovers is Lata Mangeshkar. She’s been the voice of film idols for generations, she’s a legend beyond legends. With a career spanning decades and songs in over 30 languages, Lata Mangeshkar has received numerous awards, including India’s highest civilian honor, the Bharat Ratna.

Rachana Shah and Rhythm Wagholikar express their wishes for Lata Mangeshkar

Today, September 28, The “Nightingale Of India” turns 92. Her groundbreaking first song, Dil Mera Toda, was for the film Majboor in 1948. The following year, 1949, Lata Mangeshkar grabbed the limelight with Madhubala-Mahal’s song Aayega Aanewaala. After that there was no going back for “Lata Didi”.

Such a melodious voice; such a magnanimous heart and such a humble personality. Such phenomena rarely occur !!

Our country’s ethics resonate with the sound of Lata Mangeshkar. His Voice is a slave to Masculinity, in its childish tone lies an unprecedented phenomenon.

It is the voice that has undoubtedly seeped into South Asian consciousness and is appreciated around the world as well.

Lata Mangeshkar is to music what Picasso is to painting. Without his three octaves, his soft and honeyed voice at hand, no composer could have given free rein to his musical imagination.

Authors Rachana Shah and Rhythm Wagholikar write a moving message for the Queen of Melody: “What can we say… words are not enough !!
What do we feel … feelings are not enough …
Divinity is above all.

All we can do is join our hands in gratitude and bow our heads to a divine force called Lata Mangeshkar.

Our unlimited love and our shashtang pranaam on his birthday ‘

Millions of her fans are delighted daily by her voice and she continues to have a hold on popular culture.

So here is a very happy birthday to Bharat Ratna!

Article first published: Tuesday, September 28, 2021, 4:13 PM [IST]


Source link

Sekai Project: Colorful Stage! feat. Rhythm game Hatsune Miku gets mini anime – news


The “Project Sekai Anniversary Festa 2021” event announced on Sunday that the production of a mini anime adaptation of Sega‘s Sekai Project: Colorful Stage! feat. Hatsune Miku the rhythm game on smartphone has received the green light. The 10 planned episodes of Little Séka (Puchi Seka) will broadcast for free on Youtube.


The anime will feature the characters from the game in super-distorted Forms “2.5 heads high,” and the anime will have more of a gag comedy vibe than the game itself. Sunday’s event announced that all of the game’s musical units will appear in the anime.

The game is set in Sekai, a world that realizes people’s true feelings. There are many Sekai, and each one’s shape is based on different emotions. Virtual singers perform songs from creators in the real world. The singers change their appearance depending on the feelings of the owner and help the creators discover their true feelings. Untitled songs were born at the same time as Sekai, but they are silent with no melody or lyrics. When the owner finds out his true feelings, the feelings become a titled song.

The game is a collaboration between Sega, Crypton Future Media, and Colorful Palette, a subsidiary of handmade egg. It was launched in Japan in September 2020 and will launch worldwide this year.

Source: Project Sekai Anniversary Festa 2021 stage Day 2’s flux, Game watch Going through Yaraon!



Source link

Tom Hammel • Steelin ‘Crazy Rhythm – Syncopated Times

Western swing isn’t easy to find these days, the real stuff anyway, and most of it falls heavily on the vintage western side rather than the jazz side, but Tom Hammel rises to the- above the genre. Crazy rhythm of steel is the most jazzy western swing album I’ve heard in a long time.

Played on a steel pedal guitar, “Si Tu Vois Ma Mere” becomes a lovely beach melody and “Tenderly” goes for the same lonely Hawaiian vibe. Several other tracks capture this thoughtful end of things, most notably the closest “Willow Weep For Me”. Other tracks are more upbeat, notably “Crazy Rhythm”, “Mission to Moscow” and “It’s All Your Fault” with a guest voice by Alex Pangman. “Out of Odessa”, a new title written for the album, has some truly remarkable playing moments and some mind-blowing moments.

You can play jazz and swing with any instrumentation, and it’s a jazz album, a small group improvisation, rather than the big band sound of Bob Wills. If the same notes as pedal steel guitar hits were played by a cornet, no one would hesitate to call it jazz. An accordion adds an extra layer to multiple tracks, another instrument with more jazz pedigree than most realize.

The musicians, recorded remotely from across Canada during the pandemic, all impress as they come together to create a sound with depth and layers, many of those layers being Hammel himself playing pedal guitar. , accordion, electric and acoustic guitars and ukulele. Paul Pigat joins on guitar for five of the twelve pieces, Jeremy Holmes is on double bass and James Badger is on drums. In the live version of the band, they add extra hands to play the accordion.

Whether your heart is focused solely on jazz or other roots music, you will find this set to be impressive and enjoyable. With a good balance of tempos and mood, and plenty for a musician to choose from and enjoy.

Tsar Nicholas inspects the camera


Source link

Cockatiels singing skills confirmed as they mimic human whistles in perfect harmony

New research has cemented the nearly unmatched singing skills of birds, as it has discovered that cockatiels are able to spontaneously join human hissing with near-perfect synchronicity. Besides being more than adorable, research shows that these birds are truly masters of their singing voices, able to change pitch and rhythm to effectively riffle with an entirely different species.

Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study tested three hand-raised cockatiels to see if these birds could sing “in unison” with a person whistling a melody, or at least synchronize their song in response. . Each of the three birds successfully learned to sing a walking sound as the researchers whistled a melody similar to the “Mickey Mouse Club Walk”.

This particular song is made up of two parts, each made up of 11 notes but separated by a pause. While all of the birds learned the song, only two of them spontaneously began to sing in unison with the whistle (as seen in the phenomenal recording below).

The next step used the help of a play loop, to see if changing the length of time between worms changed the pace with which the cockatiels sang. Effectively, the birds were able to adapt their song to stay in sync with the changes in pause length, pitch, and tempo, allowing them to follow what they surely thought was a banger, judging by their enthusiasm.

“I didn’t give the birds any treats to reward them for singing,” study author Yoshimasa Seki, from the psychology department at Aichi University in Japan, told Vice. “They were joining the melody for their own enjoyment and were very happy to do so.”

Seki believes the research is the first published example (to their knowledge) of a non-human animal singing to human music and synchronizing with its changing characteristics. Beyond being a great excuse to dive deep into singing cockatiel videos (some even sing opera), you might be wondering what the academic value of this information is, but Seki believes that learning Singing behavior in non-human animals could provide information on the historical uses of singing in humans.

“Singing was once a form of communication for humans,” they said. “At one point we started singing more for fun, but by studying these distant ancestors we can improve coordination and group work, even among us humans. “

Interestingly, a similar approach hopes to bring the science of translation closer to communicating with dolphins, but vice versa. The research is focused on the idea that whistled human tongues might share fundamental attributes with dolphin signals, so looking at the two side by side, we might one day crack the cetacean code.

[H/T: Vice]


Source link

Black Pumas’ Eric Burton and Adrian Queseda Explain How Two “Rhythm Players” Unintentionally Found a Retro Sound

The 2021 Grammy Awards, which took place in Los Angeles in March, was, like everything in the past year, an atypical production that only vaguely resembled its non-pandemic past.

That said, the show still managed to kick off with a double of performances from very Grammy-like artists – pop phenomena Harry Styles and Billie Eilish.

Also on the shared stage that night? The Black Pumas, who were up for three awards, including Album of the Year for the Deluxe Edition of their self-titled debut album in 2019, and who brought a bit of retro-soul flavor – and a much needed guitar-forward jam – to the stage with a dazzling performance of Colors (This song, by the way, won the group’s two additional nominations, for Recording of the Year and Best American Roots Performance).

Black Pumas, which is built around the duo of singer and guitarist Eric Burton and guitarist and producer Adrian Quesada, stood out from most of the other fare (with the exception of the pop-rock trio Haim) on the show this that night – just like their mates, a 1967 Fender Coronado for Burton and a new Fender Jaguar for Quesada that “sounded so cool with the fuzz pedal I was using,” he says. “And I tried it on with my wardrobe and it looked cool too. So, deal done.

However, they felt a kinship with their fellow musicians. “Everyone was definitely showing love,” Quesada continues. “Harry [Styles] actually came to tell us that he really liked our record. So it’s a great time to have artists supporting other artists.

Burton adds, “It was nice to play on the same stage as some of our peers who are doing really well and representing their genres with a lot of enthusiasm. ”

It should be noted that Black Pumas have also represented their own genre with great enthusiasm. “We make music from our hearts and luckily it resonates in the hearts of others as well,” says Burton. But how they got here is different from the route most groups take.

In a story that has now been told and retold (it’s a good story), Burton, who grew up in Southern California singing in church and involved in musical theater, and with minimal exposure to the secular music, cut her teeth at Santa Monica Pier, developing her singing and guitar playing – and playing performances – for the crumpled dollar bills of passers-by.

Eventually, he traveled the West Coast with musician friends before landing and staying in Austin, Texas. It was there that he met Quesada, who, 13 years his senior, had grown up in hip-hop and hair metal, spent time in a local punk-jazz band and spent more than a day. dozen years with the Grammy Award-winning Latin funk orchestra. ”Fantasma Group.

During those years, Quesada had the opportunity to play alongside Prince (“His lead guitar notes were, like, through the roof,” he recalls. “It was pretty intimidating”) and also participated in a Grupo side project, Brownout, which recorded a series of Black Sabbath covers as Brown Sabbath and performed them, at one point, for Ozzy Osbourne himself.

“We ended up being booked for festivals, and we did a private show for Ozzy and [his son] Jack. It all took on a life of its own.

In 2017, Quesada left Grupo Fantasma and was looking for a singer to add vocals to new instrumentals he was preparing in the studio. At the suggestion of a mutual friend, he called Burton, a virtual stranger in Austin – or anywhere else, for that matter. The couple turned out to be prophetic.

“Eric fits like a glove on these instrumental tracks,” recalls Quesada. “And then he started showing me his songs that were before we even knew it, it was like, ‘Oh shit, that fits perfectly with this sound that I’m making…’”

One of the songs Burton had in his pocket was Colors, which, says Quesada, “Eric wrote over 10 years ago. But it still touches that place in people’s hearts all these years later, on different levels.”

Indeed, Colors, with its puffy, almost hymnic melody and social-minded lyrics (“All My Favorite Colors / My Sisters and Brothers / See Them Like No Other,” Burton sings in a honeyed and emotional voice) has, like most of the material on Black Pumas, led the band to be tagged with a retro-soul label.

One day we’re gonna really geek out on an old soul song, and the next day we’re gonna geek out on a Mobb Deep track.

But there is more to it. “We never really decided to make retro music,” says Quesada. And while he admits that he and Burton “probably listen to older music more than we listen to newer music,” he also says their sound “sits somewhere in between. One day we’re really going to have fun playing an old soul song, and the next day we’re going to have fun playing a Mobb Deep track. And then the next day, we switch to rock’n’roll. It’s everywhere. ”

From the point of view of the guitar, Burton and Quesada define themselves as “rhythms at heart”. Although it is Quesada who handles most of the main work and the one-note melodic lines.

“I love solo guitar and I love solos,” says Quesada, “and I’ve been playing for so long that there’s a certain amount of muscle memory that persists. But, he adds, “and I’d scream that from the rooftops, Eric is a dumb guitarist, man.” There’s stuff on the record that people assumed was me on guitar, but I’m like, ‘No way, these are Eric Burton’s hands.’ I like people who play in interesting and unique ways, and Eric is one of those guys.

Regarding his approach, Burton says, “When I started playing guitar it was like a troubadour style on my own, where I hit the guitar to show percussion, play bass notes, do major minor tones in rhythms. So with my unorthodox guitar playing coupled with Adrian’s sensitivity, we have an interesting dance that we do together.

Burton and Quesada embark on this interesting dance in an effort to create the sequel to Black Pumas. But it’s still unclear when the new material will be released, or what it will look like.

“We have over 20 ideas that are in various stages of completion,” Burton said. “Some who started on acoustic, some who started on electric, some who started on the keys. We respect each other musically, so we have the opportunity to follow each other in places we don’t know, so to speak, soul being a bit of a beacon.

Quesada agrees. “I don’t remember a time when Eric showed me a song and I was like, ‘Oh man, I can’t hear it …’ My wheels always start to spin immediately – ‘I could do it. “I could do that. ‘ There is a synergy between us, and it has been like that from the start.


Source link

The melody of the recruits “terrible” in the song Happy Birthday for David Culley of the Texans

Chris Conley couldn’t garner a single compliment for the Texans rookie class. He had to be honest in his recognition report.

Where the rookies fell short in the veteran wide receiver’s estimate: Their glaring lack of melody in a “Happy Birthday” song for Texans coach David Culley, who celebrated his 66th birthday on Friday.

“There isn’t a good singer in our rookie squad,” Conley said. “It’s actually surprising. Typically in a draft class there’s one person who’s got talent. It’s a first for me.

“Who is the worst? Almost all of them. They are bad enough. They are actually really terrible.

Conley noted that the rookies were not improving despite several attempts to harmonize. It is just plain bad.

“I mean at this point we’ve heard them sing a bunch of times,” Conley said. “That’s why we keep blackmailing them.”

Traditionally, recruits are good at this stuff.

“For some reason this year they all wanted to sing and they were all terrible,” Conley said. “But in the past we’ve had guys that went out there and do comedy sketches, we’ve had guys that went out there and dance, sing. And they were actually legitimately good at it. they were doing. This year I’m glad they’re good at football.

Aaron Wilson has covered the NFL for 20 years and has previously written for The Houston Chronicle and The Baltimore Sun. He’s on Twitter: @AaronWilson_NFL and Instagram: @ aaronwilson7128


Source link